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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 13, 2022
In Perennial
Common Name | Thompson Broom Scientific Name | Baccharis Stam Type | Herbaceous Perennial Zone | 7 - 10 Size | 3' x 5' Lighting | Full NM Sun Soil Type | Well draining Soil PH | 5 Flowering Growth Rate | Slow Pollinator | Not Required Description Drought tolerant, tolerates poor soil. Pruning Early spring if reshaping credit - AG&N Gardner Submitted
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 13, 2022
In Perennial
Common Name | Mountain Ninebark Scientific Name | Physocarpus Type | Herbaceous Perennial Zone | 5-7 Size | 3' x 3' Lighting | Partial NM Sun Soil Type | Well draining, rocky, loam Soil PH | 4 Flowering Growth Rate | Fast Pollinator | Not Required Description Native to Rocky Mountains, small flowers Pruning Early spring if reshaping credit - AG&N Gardener Submission
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 13, 2022
In Perennial
Common Name | Rabbitbrush Scientific Name | Chrysothamnus Type | Herbaceous Perennial Zone | 3 - 7 Size | 5' x 5' Lighting | Full NM Sun Soil Type | Well draining Soil PH | 4 Fruiting Growth Rate | Moderate Pollinator | Not required Description Drought tolerant, pollinator attractor Pruning Early spring if reshaping credit - AG&N Gardner Submission
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 13, 2022
In Deciduous
Common Name | Mountain Mahogany Scientific Name | Cercocarpus Type | Deciduous Zone | 5 - 10 Size | 5' - 12' x 5' - 10' Lighting | Full NM Sun Soil Type | Well draining rocky Soil PH | 4 Flowering Growth Rate | Slow to Moderate Pollinator | Not required Description Native, no major pests, drought tolerant, does well in east mountains, cold tolerant, deer resistant. Pruning Early spring if reshaping credit - AG&N Gardner Submission
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 13, 2022
In Perennial
Common Name | Forsythia Scientific Name | Forsythia Type | Herbaceous Perennial Zone | 5 - 9 Size | 3'-6' x 3'-6' Lighting | Partial NM Sun Soil Type | Well draining Soil PH | 3 Flowering Growth Rate | Fast Pollinator | Not required Description Bright yellow flowers in early spring one of the first to bloom. Pruning Early spring if reshaping. credit - AG&N Gardner Submission
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 13, 2022
In Perennial
Common Name | Lilac Scientific Name | Syringa Type | Herbaceous Perennial Zone | 3 - 7 Size | 6' x 6' Lighting: Moderate NM Shade Soil Type | Well draining with high organic matter Soil PH | 4 Flowering Growth Rate | Fast Pollinator | Not required Description Fragrant, great for pollinators, various shades of purple and white. Pruning Cut off spent flowers regularly. Early spring if reshaping, can be trimmed into multi trunk or tree shape. If needed you can remove 1/2 of body when trimming. credit - AG&N Gardner Submission
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 13, 2022
In Perennial
Common Name | Rose of Sharon Scientific Name | Althea Type | Herbaceous Perennial Zone | 5 - 9 Size | 15' x 6' Lighting | Partial NM Sun Soil Type | Rich, well drawing, organic matter Soil PH | 2 Flowering Growth Rate | Moderate to fast Pollinator | Not required Description Many different colors and shades, some have ruffles Pruning Flowers grow on the current years growth so early spring trimming may result in failure to bud. Trim in late winter. Can be trimmed to tree shape or multi trunk. credit - AG&N Gardner Submission
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 12, 2022
In Deciduous
Common Name | Medjool Date Palm Binomial Name | Phoenix Dactylifera Type | Deciduous Zone | 8 - 10 Size | In ground 69-75ft Lighting | Full NM Sun Soil Type | Well draining, sand, loam, even clay. Well watered while flowering & fruiting, dry while not Soil PH | 8 - 11 Seeding, Flowering, Fruiting Growth RateSlow | 12"-18" a year Pollinator | Yes; wind, bees, other insects Description An elegant palm with an arching canopy of silvery blue-green fronds, the Medjool date palm (Phoenix dacytlifera 'Medjool') is particularly tolerant of warm climates with higher humidity. It is a large-growing palm that needs full sun, fertile but well-draining soils and winters that do not get too cold and wet, Central to Northern New Mexico you will need to bring them in for the winter. Date palms bear a branching flowering structure in the warm of spring and summer that are pollinated by insects and wind, leading to the formation of the renowned fruits. The sweet dates become a bi-colored blend of golden yellow and orange-red when ripe for picking. NM Care Plant in well draining soil. (We use Soilutions Super soil mixed with local sand & lava rock) After planting in pot or ground, continue to water the root ball of the newly transplanted palm for the first growing season. Soil should remain slightly dry to moist, never bone dry or soggy wet. In winter, reduce watering so that the soil is slightly drier than the watering regime you did in the growing season. In general, cold winters with wet soil conditions are not favorable for date palm survival, again Central to Northern New Mexico you will need to bring them in for the winter, Alamogordo and below you should be fine. Remove palm fronds only when then turn brown and dry. Premature cutting of healthy green fronds robs the palm of food and can lead to poorer health, increased susceptibility to pests or diseases and can lead to nutrient deficiencies. Yellowing fronds are good to retain since the nutrients are drained from the dying fronds and used elsewhere in the plant. Warning The lowermost portion of the Medjool date palm's fronds are lined with thin, vicious spines. Use thick gloves when pruning or working around the data palm's canopy of leaves. Date palms grow large and are massive and heavy when mature.
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 12, 2022
In Deciduous
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 12, 2022
In Perennial
Common Name | Tulips Binomial Name | Tulipa Type | Perennial Zone | 3 - 8 Size | 6" - 2' tall 6" wide Lighting | Partial NM Sun Soil Type | loose, crumbly soil that is easy to work with and well drained Soil PH | 5 Flowering Growth Rate | 13 - 25" year Pollinator | Bees, Birds, Wind Description Tulips (Tulipa) are a genus of spring-blooming perennial herbaceous bulbiferous geophytes (having bulbs as storage organs). The flowers are usually large, showy and brightly colored, generally red, pink, yellow, or white (usually in warm colors). They often have a different colored blotch at the base of the tepals (petals and sepals, collectively), internally. Because of a degree of variability within the populations, and a long history of cultivation, classification has been complex and controversial. The tulip is a member of the lily family, Liliaceae, along with 14 other genera, where it is most closely related to Amana, Erythronium and Gagea in the tribe Lilieae. There are about 75 species, and these are divided among four subgenera. The name "tulip" is thought to be derived from a Persian word for turban, which it may have been thought to resemble by those who discovered it. Tulips originally were found in a band stretching from Southern Europe to Central Asia, but since the seventeenth century have become widely naturalised and cultivated (see map). In their natural state they are adapted to steppes and mountainous areas with temperate climates. Flowering in the spring, they become dormant in the summer once the flowers and leaves die back, emerging above ground as a shoot from the underground bulb in early spring. Growing wild over much of the Near East and Central Asia, tulips were cultivated in Constantinople as early as 1055. By the 15th century, tulips were among the most prized flowers; becoming the symbol of the Ottomans. While tulips had probably been cultivated in Persia from the tenth century, they did not come to the attention of the West until the sixteenth century, when Western diplomats to the Ottoman court observed and reported on them. They were rapidly introduced into Europe and became a frenzied commodity during Tulip mania. Tulips were frequently depicted in Dutch Golden Age paintings, and have become associated with the Netherlands, the major producer for world markets, ever since. In the seventeenth century Netherlands, during the time of the Tulip mania, an infection of tulip bulbs by the tulip breaking virus created variegated patterns in the tulip flowers that were much admired and valued. While truly broken tulips do not exist anymore, the closest available specimens today are part of the group known as the Rembrandts – so named because Rembrandt painted some of the most admired breaks of his time. Breeding programs have produced thousands of hybrid and cultivars in addition to the original species (known in horticulture as botanical tulips). They are popular throughout the world, both as ornamental garden plants and as cut flowers. credit - Wikipedia | https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulip
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 12, 2022
In Perennial
Common Name | Poinsettia Binomial Name | Euphorbia Pulcherrima Zone | 9 - 10 Size | In ground 3-10ft tall x 10x12 wide! Lighting | Partial NM Sun Soil Type | well draining keep moist Soil PH | 5.8-6.2 Flowering Growth RateFast | (if given ammonium Fert when not flowering) Description Native to Mexico, poinsettias are in the Euphorbia family and are a popular holiday plant because of their colorful bracts (leaves). There is also a species that is used as a cut flower. They are most commonly used for decorating during the winter holidays, but are also attractive as green plants throughout the year. Poinsettias change color in response to shorter winter days. Poinsettia flowers are actually made up of the bracts, which look like petals, and the tiny yellow flowers in the center, called cyathia. The colorful bracts attract insects to the flowers and will drop after pollination. Poinsettias are not harmful to animal or human health. But they should not be eaten. The sticky white sap can cause a skin rash, so gloves are recommended when working with these plants. Avoid contact with eyes and mouth. Wash tools well after use as the sap can make tools sticky. Light Indoor light: Put in a south, east or west window where the plant will receive bright daylight. Outdoor light: Part sun, 4 to 6 hours daily. Temperature: Indoor temperatures of 65-70 degrees F is ideal. Avoid placing poinsettias where temperature fluctuates or may be drying, such as near cold drafts, heat ducts, fireplaces, fans, space heaters, etc. Poinsettias will suffer damage if they are exposed to temperatures below 50 degrees F. Freezing temperatures will kill poinsettias. Wattering Keep soil moist. Water plant when the soil surface feels dry to a light touch, or pot feels lightweight when lifted. Never allow poinsettias to get so dry that they wilt. Remove from decorative foil or outer pot before watering. Make sure your plant is in a pot that drains freely. Set plant in a sink and water thoroughly, allowing the plant to drain completely. Never allow poinsettia pots to sit in excess water. Constant wetness will rot plant roots. Continue watering as needed January through March. Fertilization You do not need to fertilize your poinsettia during the holidays. Start fertilizing your plant when you see new growth (new green leaves, stems, bracts). Fertilize with an all-purpose household plant fertilizer. Mix with water it at half the recommended strength. Feed your poinsettia every 3-4 weeks to keep plant healthy and provide the necessary nutrients for new growth. credit - university of Minnesota | https://extension.umn.edu/houseplants/poinsettia#watering-1579961
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Kenneth Tittle
Jan 11, 2022
In Indoor Plants
Common Name | Christmas Cactus Binomial Name | Schlumbergera Type | Biennials Zone | 9 - 10 Size | 4ftx4ft Lighting | Partial NM Sun Soil Type | Rocky Dry Soil PH | 5-5.5 Seeding, Flowering, Fruiting Growth Rate | 8-12in / year Pollinator | Bees, tap flowers to fruit Schlumbergera is a small genus of cacti with six to nine species found in the coastal mountains of south-eastern Brazil. These plants grow on trees or rocks in habitats that are generally shady with high humidity, and can be quite different in appearance from their desert-dwelling cousins. Most species of Schlumbergera have stems which resemble leaf-like pads joined one to the other and flowers which appear from areoles at the joints and tips of the stems. Two species have cylindrical stems more similar to other cacti. Recent phylogenetic studies using DNA have led to three species of the related genus Hatiora being transferred into Schlumbergera,[1] though this change is not universally accepted. Common names for these cacti generally refer to their flowering season. In the Northern Hemisphere, they are called Christmas cactus, Thanksgiving cactus, crab cactus and holiday cactus. In Brazil, the genus is referred to as Flor de Maio (May flower), reflecting the period in which they flower in the Southern Hemisphere. Most of the popular houseplants are cultivars of Schlumbergera, rather than species, with flowers in white, pink, yellow, orange, red or purple. The Easter cactus or Whitsun cactus, until recently placed in the genus Hatiora, is also called a holiday cactus and has flowers in red, orange, pink and white. The cultivars of the Christmas cactus fall into two main groups: The Truncata Group contains all cultivars with features derived mainly from the species S. truncata: stem segments with pointed teeth; flowers held more or less horizontally, usually above the horizontal, whose upper side is differently shaped from the lower side (zygomorphic); and pollen which is yellow. They generally flower earlier than members of the Buckleyi Group and, although common names are not applied consistently, may be distinguished as Thanksgiving cactus, crab cactus or claw cactus. The Buckleyi Group contains all cultivars with at least some features clearly showing inheritance from S. russelliana: stem segments with rounded, more symmetrical teeth; more or less symmetrical (regular) flowers which hang down, below the horizontal; and pollen which is pink. They generally flower later than members of the Truncata Group and are more likely to be called Christmas cactus. Credit - iNaturalist (https://guatemala.inaturalist.org/taxa/51224-Schlumbergera)
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Kenneth Tittle
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